Everyone on Staff is in Sales (whether they realize it or not)

Here’s the Skinny,

I’ve been saying for years, “anything you ever do to earn income requires selling.”

There are obvious direct sales roles, but even the “best” of those have been re-positioned as “consultative selling” by today’s standards.  Financial advisors may now be the best example of the consultative (and fiduciary) approach to building business (aka, selling), with attorneys, accountants and consultants in that same category.

Beyond that, no matter what the role someone plays on staff, sales skills are “still” required – even if you don’t think of them that way.  Imagine a receptionist (the voice of your company), or customer service rep (CSR) dealing with both happy and disgruntled customers.  Every situation you can imagine requires some sales skills:

  1. Helping a customer make a decision or choice of any kind.
  2. Handling a difficult conversation and/or delivering bad news.
  3. Getting along with co-workers.
  4. Solving problems and creating solutions of any kind.
  5. Project management and/or new initiatives.
  6. Thinking creatively.
  7. Interviewing for a job.

Simply put, revenue dries up and the world stops spinning without sales.  My dad used to always say to me, “nothing happens until someone sells something.”  But the trick is, people don’t actually want to be “sold.” However, they love to “buy” and they very much appreciate sincere assistance and trusted guidance in every situation along the way.

Quote - Jay Abraham

My point for sharing this today is simply that I read the blog re-posted below from Seth Godin (best-selling business author) and felt it was one of the better ones I’ve seen that describes the subtleties and broad scope for all that includes sales…

Enjoy & and may I suggest, contemplate:


“I’m not selling anything” (from Seth Godin)

Of course you are. You’re selling connection or forward motion. You’re selling a new way of thinking, a better place to work, a chance to make a difference. Or perhaps you’re selling possibility, generosity or sheer hard work.

It might be that the selling you’re doing costs time and effort, not money, but if you’re trying to make change happen, then you’re selling something.

If you’re not trying to make things better, why are you here?

So sure, you’re selling something.

Perhaps it would be more accurate to say, “I’m not selling something too aggressively, invading your space, stealing your attention and pushing you to do something that doesn’t match your goals.”

That’s probably true. At least I hope it is.


(But if you are any good at all, you are always selling something, especially through infectious enthusiasm for what you do.)

That’s the Skinny,

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